Grumpy and Grumpier

I apparently am a member of Generation Grumpy, which refers, at least in its original designation as Grumpy Middle, to those born between 1962 and 1971, and I didn’t even know it.

Those of us between 45-54, according to the Chicago Tribune editorial writers, have had “a remarkable mix of boom and bust, pleasure and pain” throughout our adult lives, including multiple recessions (e.g., the 1980 and 1982 double recession) and crashes (e.g., the 1987 stock market collapse), as well as have experienced the effects of globalization and the internet. Moreover, our gains, such as record stock market growth, have been limited by lingering losses, such as years or weak economic and wage growth.

Continue reading “Grumpy and Grumpier”

Contracting Relations

I’m intrigued by the intersections of social and economic interests through texts, which attempt to capture or represent in two-dimensional forms messy, and multidimensional, human experience.

These conditions were recently evident when sellers had agreed to terms of a recent condo offer, which included a six month lease followed by the closing. My real estate agent submitted a signed offer, and the sellers reportedly showed their lawyer, who had approved and was adding local riders, which the sellers would send within the hour. Several hours later, the sellers informed the agent that they had received, and were going to accept, a higher offer even though they liked our offer better.  Continue reading “Contracting Relations”

Breaking The All-Star Break

My annual summer retreat ended in dramatic fashion about a week ago. The Chicago Cubs were winning 8-0 by the top of the third, had lost the lead in the bottom of the eighth, and then won 9-8 with a home run in the top of the ninth.

Since the end of the 2017 MLB All-Star break, the Cubs have won eight of ten games and improved their pitching with the recent Sox trade. Nevertheless, the unofficial end of the first half was actually a relief this season because the Cubs have been lackluster although the recent trade suggests a seriousness about contending.

The Cubs, according to renown FiveThirtyEight statistical analysis, actually have had one of the worst World Series Champion starts in the history of baseball. Many predict that this team will have a better second half, but many had been predicting that they would have a much better season, especially given how much of the championship team returned. Continue reading “Breaking The All-Star Break”