Mission Impossible

Succumbing to the hype, I saw Mission: Impossible Rogue Nation, the new action movie based upon the 1966-1973 American television series created by Bruce Geller.

In this fifth installment of the franchise, Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) must reassemble the Impossible Mission Force, which consists of William Brandt (Jeremy Renner), Benji Dunn (Simon Pegg), and Luther Stickell (Ving Rhames), to dismantle the Syndicate, a mysterious organization of presumably deceased agents. Their efforts are aided by Ilsa Faust (Rebecca Ferguson), who might or might not be part of this rogue organization.  Continue reading “Mission Impossible”

Stories to Live By

studiesI admit that, as the summer started, I had seen the three biggest box office movies although I thought all, as films, were flops.

That surprised me given that review aggregation sites suggested average or better evaluations of each. Although each had a lower rating if the sample was limited to the more credible critics, the worst movie, even if only using these these critics, had a 4 in 10 average rating.  Continue reading “Stories to Live By”

Digital Tools and the Humanities

I am intrigued by the potential relevance of social media and other digital tools to the goals of the humanities.

Reading, writing, and the humanities have often been connected to social, cultural, and political developments. Some, for example, argue that societies have become increasingly complex by developing technologies and systems, including literacy, that encourage coordination and cooperation, which produces an increasingly complicated interdependence that constitutes cultural evolution, and that a humanistic, liberal arts education, as critical thinking and self-examination, human connection and concern, and narrative imagination, leads to the cultivation of humanity and is central to democratic societies (Nussbaum 1997 and 2010 and Wright 2000). Continue reading “Digital Tools and the Humanities”